Posts Tagged ‘contributing factors’

Contributing Factors: The T-Bone

Friday, November 7th, 2008

There are a wide variety of contributing factors associated with vehicle accidents, and careful analysis is required to fully and accurately determine fault because of these many factors. For instance, let’s consider the case of a “T-Bone” type collision.

In this hypothetical collision, there is a Chevrolet traveling south on Hwy 11 when a Nissan pulls out from a side road into the path of the Chevrolet, and the Chevrolet impacts into the passenger side of the Nissan. Who is at fault in this collision? That can depend on several factors. Below is a partial list of possible contributing factors for each vehicle.

                                   

Nissan Chevrolet
Disregarded a Stop Sign Speeding
Failed to Yield the Right of Way Inattentiveness
Headlights Not Illuminated Headlights Not Illuminated

Only through a careful and thorough investigation can fault be accurately assigned. Our accident reconstructionists can typically confirm or disprove which of these were in fact the cause(s) of the accident. The following are various questions about contributing factors that you might have and the corresponding methodology we have available to answer those questions.

Question: Did the driver disregard the stop sign?

Answer: Based on impact speed and acceleration calculations we can determine whether it is reasonable for a vehicle to reach its speed after stopping at the stop sign.

Question: Was the vehicle speeding?

Answer: We can do various calculations to determine speed based on damage patterns, departure angles, and final rest locations. Also, we may be able to download crash data recorder information that can answer this question.

Question: Was the driver paying attention?

Answer: Based on speed/time/distance calculations, we can determine the approximate location where and the time when the driver perceived the hazard of the other vehicle and began to react. Then, we can attest to whether or not this information is consistent with a typical and attentive perception and response.

Question: Were the vehicle’s lights on?

Answer: In most cases this can be determined by forensic evidence that can be documented and collected.

Other questions that we consider and have the ability to analyze and address include:

· Was fog present creating a sight distance and headlight issue?

· Did sun glare obstruct or limit the view of the driver?

· Were the ambient light conditions such that the vehicle would have been visible?

· Were the proper traffic controls in place and appropriately located?

· Did the environmental conditions call for a reduction in the reasonable speed to be traveling?

As you can see, it is not a simple matter to say one or the other party is at fault. It takes a conscientious consideration of many possible factors.

Jonathan McGehee